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English Training Centre

Discussion in 'Players´ Corner' started by pek712, Sep 28, 2014.

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  1. pek712

    pek712 All knowing Oracle

    Found something Kitty
    [​IMG]
     
  2. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    Thanks, Pek! I found Padawan, as I mentioned above. The problem seems to be with the spelling Padavan. If you find anything about that, I will be glad to learn it.
    Yours, Kitty
     
    feej1274 likes this.
  3. feej1274

    feej1274 Living Forum Legend

    Maybe it's just a typo Kitty:eek:
     
  4. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    Hello, friends! (wave)
    I have a question again. How do you lure an English-speaking cat out of its den? I don't mean some practical advice, that I know: a saucer of salmon. I mean, what do you say, especially if you don't know the cat's name? What I've come across in books is not the thing anyone nowadays would really want to chant in public, so there must be something else, which I cannot find.
    Please, help out a Kitty in distress! :oops:
     
    promaster302 likes this.
  5. promaster302

    promaster302 Forum Demigod

    Hi kitty, sorry because im late to respond anyway where are some tips:

    Give him a little more time. It can take a while for a cat to get acclimated to a new environment. He'll come out and start exploring when he's comfortable.
    If you can, get him into a separate room (spare bedroom, extra bath, maybe laundry room); what he seems to need is his own territory. , he'll explore more when he's comfortable, and in the meantime he needs his own space to get comfortable in. The smaller the better, as long as you can get the essentials in there (food, water, litter box). Having him confined in a small room will also allow you to spend some more time with him and show him you're not a threat. Just sitting in the room with him, quietly, will help him see you're not the enemy and should bring him around after a few days, at least to the point of coming up for a sniff or two. Just for now, stop trying to touch him in any way at all. Try avoiding eye contact with him, if he catches your eye, just do a slow blink and look away, maybe follow up with a slow yawn (that's cat lingo for "Hi, I see you, all is well"). Ask everyone in your home to follow the same rules about this. Put up a couple of Feliway diffuses, one in the kitchen, where he's lurking and one in the room nearest to it. The pheromone from this will tell him that the place already smells of him, and he'll feel more relaxed and probably more willing to come out.
    you can run the vacuum cleaner nearby and he pops out to hide somewhere else. In the meantime you can be able to grab him... I think that all of a sudden the cat wont hide/run away NEARLY as much since you started doing this.
    If you're worried about how to get the cat into the carrier for transporting to the vet where what can you do: leaving the carrier out, 24/7, in whatever room the cat likes to spend time in, and putting nonperishable treats in it. Catnip, bonito flakes, and dehydrated liver.

    At first, he scarfed the treats at night or when you aren't around. Later (much later) he got to the point of hanging out in the carrier several times a day, as a way of asking for treats. The carrier became the primary method by which he could get treats (you occasionally gave him treats for nothing, but we try to use treats mostly for reinforcing desired behaviors.) The point is, to make the carrier familiar to him (part of the furniture of his new environment), and associate it with something positive, because otherwise, all the carrier means to our cat is injections, getting thermometers stuck up his butt, and other indignities.
    (sorry about English i usually dont write long paragraphs in it)
    hope these works:)!
     
  6. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    Thanks, Pro! Of course, it helps to people who are not familiar with cats.
    But my question is linguistic, as I specified. It is about the phrase the English use to call cats.
    So, I am still hoping for an answer. I came across kissy sounds and clicking mentioned in a forum, but there must be some articulate verbal expression, as well...
     
  7. promaster302

    promaster302 Forum Demigod

    sorry about not understanding your post,kitty.

    maybe ''here here kitty kitty'' can help, when i forget his name (my cats name) i always call him that and he responds.
     
  8. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    'Kitty-kitty' sounds fine enough. Thanks again, Pro.
     
    promaster302 likes this.
  9. BeastMasterXXX

    BeastMasterXXX Living Forum Legend

    Hey Kitty (wave)

    Yes, I think Pro has got that one right.

    Here Kitty Kitty or C'mon Kitty - is probably the sort of thing you are looking for.

    Best of luck,

    Beast (hug)
     
    promaster302 likes this.
  10. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    Thanks a lot, Beast! (hug)
     
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  11. promaster302

    promaster302 Forum Demigod

    Hi friends.

    I have 3 questions:

    1. Can ''and'' be in front and have a capital 'a'? example: And what about people that just want to travel?.

    2. Why do we use - in English? example: ice-cream.

    3. Same as #2 Why do we use - in English? example: If they are volunteers - maybe working on a environmental project in the jungle for example of money - they are payed a small amount - just like pocket money.
     
  12. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    1. The answer of a teacher (non-native speaker): Yes, you can, but in the colloquial register. I would mark it as stylistically inappropriate in an essay. As I would a rhetorical question of that sort, by the way. Such a sentence interrupts the sequence of logical statements which an essay is supposed to present. It is fine in a speech or a dialogue but is a poor attempt to replace the topical sentence of a paragraph in academic writing. (I presume you are asking about writing because you mention a capital 'a'.)
    2. The answer of a linguist: in the course of time, some free combinations of lexical items become stable and express a single concept. In this case, not 'very cold+cream' but 'a kind of popular frozen dessert'. That is what the hyphen means - one idea, and not a sum of ideas. The next step in the development of a lexical item is removing the hyphen and making it one word. Practically, it is very difficult to define at which stage a lexical item is at present because people of various ages and backgrounds use the hyphen differently. An elderly English teacher I used to have at high school would never accept 'goodbye' hyphened, as we wrote it - to her it was 'good bye'. Nowadays dictionaries give it as one word. The item 'living room' is somewhere between two separate words and a hyphened single concept, so you can see it as 'living room' and 'living-room' in different texts. That is why, when dictation is an exam format task, the practice is to dictate the hyphens, as we do all punctuation marks. When you write, check with the most contemporary academic dictionary you have at hand. The social media and the high-tech means of communication are promoting their own, 'economical' language: no punctuation, no capital letters, plenty of acronyms (OMG), symbols and foreign words; I expect to see no intervals sooner than I would like to. That will inevitably reflect on the literary norms but I hope I will not see Orwell's 'newspeak' or Burgess' 'nadsat' in action in my lifetime.
    3. The answer of a user of the language: the dash has always been a mystery to me. I have seen it replace a pair of commas, a colon, parentheses or even dots at the end of a line to show an interruption. I avoid it as much as possible. Besides, that thing about en-dash and em-dash is totally out of my league.
    It would be interesting to see the opinion of our English friends, though. :)
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2015
    promaster302 likes this.
  13. BeastMasterXXX

    BeastMasterXXX Living Forum Legend

    Hey Pro

    As this is the English Training Centre, I would like to point out that 'payed' should be 'paid'
     
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  14. promaster302

    promaster302 Forum Demigod

    thanks beast and kitty.
     
    BeastMasterXXX likes this.
  15. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    Hello, friends!
    It's Christmas time again and I have been wondering: is there a greeting formula like Happy Christmas? I saw it on a greeting card and it suddenly struck me as odd. I've heard some people favour Happy Holidays and others - Merry Christmas. What's the case with the hybrid? I've just seen the map of Christmas greetings Pro has posted (thanks, Pro!): Merry/Happy Christmas for the English-speaking nations... Could it be that Merry Christmas is a Christmas Eve wish and Happy Christmas - a Christmas Day congratulation?
    In Bulgarian we do make a difference, actually, now that I've come to think about it...
    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Dec 25, 2015
    promaster302 likes this.
  16. promaster302

    promaster302 Forum Demigod

    Welcome KittyxD.

    I think you will find that “Happy Christmas” is what they say in England and much of its Commonwealth, whereas “Merry Christmas” is what they say in America. I suspect this is an example of American English preserving older expressions that were current when the colonies were settled but that have since dropped out of British English. (Another example would be “Fall” instead of “Autumn.”) Americans went through Prohibition but still used “Merry,” whereas Australians–who make merry quite a bit in the 16th century sense–still use “Happy Christmas.”
    Merry Christmas and Happy Christmas are both greetings used during the last part of December, around Christmastime. The first word of each is only capitalized when used as a greeting. When one is speaking of a happy or merry Christmas, the adjectives are lowercase.
    Merry Christmas began as a saying in the 1500s. It was recorded in a letter as a wish that God would send the recipient a “mery Christmas”. It was solidified as a capitalized greeting by Charles Dickens in his great work A Christmas Carol.
    Queen Elizabeth II, for whatever reason, did not use Dickens’ phrase. Instead, she used the phrase Happy Christmas in her broadcasts to her subjects. After her use, the term gained popularity and is still the most common form in Great Britain and Ireland.
    There is debate whether or not the greeting has religious meaning and whether a more generic Happy Holidays should be used instead to respect non-Christian views.
     
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  17. feej1274

    feej1274 Living Forum Legend

    Hi Kitty, I would just like to add something that is not copied and pasted from the internet, and being an actual UK born and bred resident.I feel, for me anyway, there is absolutely no difference from saying Happy/Merry Christmas, in my eyes they mean the same thing and depending on the moment I will use either. So for me and i only speak for me they have the same meaning as being Merry can also mean HappyxD
     
  18. whitekitty

    whitekitty Forum Baron

    Thanks, Pro!
    Thank you, Fee! That's what I needed to know - whether you feel any difference that would make you tolerate a particular expression on a particular occasion.
    Fine, I'm at peace with the world now, let's have that New Year coming!
    Have a lot of fun and may all your dreams and wishes come true!
    (hug) (party) (chuckle)
     
  19. feej1274

    feej1274 Living Forum Legend

    Your welcome Kitty(chuckle)(hug)
     
  20. pek712

    pek712 All knowing Oracle

    This has bothered me for quite some time.

    What is the plural of the word 'fruit'?
    I read somewhere that it's 'fruit' without an s, like one fruit, many fruit.
    But I have also noticed people using 'fruits'.

    Which is correct?
     
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